Evils of Eisenhower’s personal Holocaust as He Slaughter Millions

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Eisenhower, in his personal letters, did not merely hate the Nazi Regime, and the few who imposed its will down from the top, but that HE HATED THE GERMAN PEOPLE AS A RACE. It was his personal intent to destroy as many of them as he could, and one way was to wipe out as many prisoners of war as possible. Of course, that was illegal under International law, so he issued an order on March 10, 1945 and verified by his initials on a cable of that date, that German Prisoners of War be predesignated as “Disarmed Enemy Forces” called in these reports as DEF. He ordered that these Germans did not fall under the Geneva Rules, and were not to be fed or given any water or medical attention. The Swiss Red Cross was not to inspect the camps, for under the DEF classification, they had no such authority or jurisdiction

The prisoners received on the first day a small portion of food, but on the second and subsequent days it was cut in half. To get it, they were forced to run through the formation of soldiers. Hunched over, they ran between the rows of American guards who beat them with sticks as they approach to food. April 27 they were transferred to the American camp Heidesheim, where for several days there was no food at all, and then only slightly.

Under the open sky, starved, tortured by thirst, people began to die. Liebig counted daily from 10 to 30 bodies that were dragged out of his section “B”, which contained about 5,200 people. He saw the prisoner scored another to death because of a small piece of bread.
One night, when the rain came, Liebig said that the walls of the hole dug in the sandy ground to cover, hit the people who were too weak to get out from under them. They suffocated before it could come to the aid of their comrades …

German POW’s Diary Reveals More Of Ike’s Holocaust 12-29-3 Note – The following diary extract has been provided by the nephew of the author under the conditions we honor his request for anonymity. -ed A transcript of my Uncle’s words…from my Mother’s diary: “Suddenly an American Jeep moved towards us and several American Soldiers surrounded us. There was no officer in charge, and the first thing the ‘Amis’ did – they liberated us, I mean, from our few valuables, mainly rings and watches…….. We were now prisoners of war- no doubt about it! The first night we were herded into a barn, where we met about 100 men who shared the same fate. To make my story short, we were finally transported to Fuerstenfeldbruck near Munich. Here we, who were gathered around Hermann, interrupted him and gasped in dismay. Fuerstenfeldbruck had become known to us as one of the most cruel POW camps in the American zone.
Then my brother continued: Again we were searched and had to surrender everything, even our field utensils, except a spoon. Here, in freezing temperature, 20,000 of us were squeezed together on the naked ground, without blanket or cover, exposed day and night to the winter weather. For six days we received neither food nor water! We used our spoons to catch drops of rain. We were surrounded by heavy tanks. During the night bright searchlights blinded us, so that sleep was impossible. We napped from time to time, standing up and leaning against each other. It was keeping us warmer that sitting on the frozen ground. Many of us were near collapse. One of our comrades went mad, he jumped around wildly, wailing and whimpering. he was shot at once. His body was lying on the ground, and we were not allowed to come near him. He was not he only one. Each suspicious movement caused the guards to shoot into the crowd, and a few were always hit.

German civilians, mainly women of the surrounding villages, tried to approach the camp to bring food and water for us prisoners. they were chased away. Our German officers could finally succeed to submit an official protest, particularly because of the deprivation of water. As a response, a fire hose was thrown into the midst of the densely crowded prisoners and then turned on. Because of the high water pressure the hose moved violently to and fro. Prisoners tumbled, fell, got up and ran again to catch a bit of water. In that confusion the water went to waste, and the ground under us turned into slippery mud. All the while the ‘Amis’ watched that spectacle, finding it very funny and most entertaining. They laughed at our predicament as hard as they could.
Then suddenly, they turned the water off again. We had not expected that the Americans would behave in such a manner. We could hardly believe it. War brutalizes human beings. One day later we were organized into groups of 400 men …. We were to receive two cans of food for each man. This is how it was to be done: The prisoners had to run through he slippery mud, and each one had to grab his two cans quickly, at the moment he passed the guards. One of my comrades slipped and could not run fast enough, He was shot at once ….
On May 10th , several truckloads of us were transported the the garrison of Ulm by the Danube….. As each man jumped into the truck, a guard kicked him in the backbone with his rifle butt. We arrived in the city of Heilbronn by the Neckar, In the end we counted 240,000 men, who lived on the naked ground and without cover. Spring and summer were mild this year, but we were starving. At 6;00 am we received coffee, at noon about a pint of soup and 100 grams of bread a day……..

The ‘Amis’ gave us newspapers in German language, describing the terrors of the concentration camps. We did not believe any of it. We figured the Americans only wanted to demoralize us further. The fields on which we lived belonged to the farmers of the area…soon nothing of the clover and other sprouting greens were left, and the trees were barren. We had eaten each blade of grass….. In some camps there were Hungarian POW’s. 15,000 of them. Mutiny against their officers broke out twice amongst them. After the second mutiny the Americans decided to use German prisoners to govern the Hungarians. Since the Hungarians were used as workers they were well fed. There was more food than they could eat. But when the Germans asked the Americans for permission to bring the Hungarians’ leftovers into the camps of the starving Germans, it was denied. The Americans rather destroyed surplus food, than giving it to the Germans. Sometimes it happened that groups of our own men were gathered and transported away. We presumed they were discharged to go home, and naturally, we wished to be among them. Much later we heard they were sent to labor camps! My mother’s cousin, feared that he would be drafted into the Hitler Youth SS, he volunteered to the marines, in 1945 his unit was in Denmark. On April 20th they were captured by the Americans. his experience in the POW camp was identical that of my brother’s. They lived in open fields, did not receive and food and water the first six days, and starved nearly to death. German wives and mothers who wanted to throw loaves of bread over the fence, were chased off.

The prisoners, just to have something to chew, scraped the bark from young trees. my cousins job was to report each morning how many had died during the night. “and these were not just a few!” he adds to his report he wrote me. It became known, that the conditions in the POW camps in the American Zone were identical everywhere. We could therefore safely conclude, that it was by intent and by orders from higher ups to starve the German POW’s and we blamed General Eisenhower for it. He, who was of German descent could not discern the evildoers during the Nazi time from our decent people. We held that neglect of knowledge and understanding severely against him. I wish to quote the inscription on the grave stones of those of my German compatriots who have already passed away: We had to pass through fire and through water. But now you have loosened our bonds.

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